Arabs in Israel

   Israel's Declaration of Independence commits to "foster the development of the country for the benefit of all inhabitants . . . based on freedom, justice and peace as envisaged by the prophets of Israel." Israel's non-Jewish citizenry is composed mainly of the Arabs who remained in what became Israel after the 1949 armistice agreements and their descendants. By 2005, that group had grown to some 1.35 million, or 18 percent of the overall population, primarily as a result of a high birthrate. The Muslim population, which constitutes about three fourths of the non-Jewish population, is predominantly Sunni. Christians constitute about 14 percent of the non-Jewish population. Greek Catholics and Greek Orthodox constitute more than 70 percent of that number, but there are also Roman Catholics, Maronites, Armenians, Protestants, and Anglicans.
   The non-Jewish communities have special status, similar to that enjoyed under the Ottoman millet system. After Israel's War of Independence (1948—49) and the 1949 armistice agreements, the activities of the Arab community were regarded primarily as concerns of Israel's security system, and most of the areas inhabited by the Arabs were placed under military control. Military government was established in those districts, and special defense and security zones were created. Israel's Arabs were granted citizenship with full legal equality but were forbidden to travel into or out of security areas without permission of the military. Those who argued in support of the military administration saw it as a means of controlling the Arab population and of preventing infiltration from neighboring hostile Arab states, sabotage, and espionage. It was argued that the very existence of the military administration was an important deterrent measure. However, as it became clear that Israel's Arabs were not disloyal and as Israel's security situation improved, pressure for relaxation and then for total abolition of military restrictions on Israel's Arabs grew in the Knesset and in public debate. The extensive restrictions were gradually modified, and on 1 December 1966, military government was abolished. Functions that had been exercised by the military government were transferred to relevant civilian authorities.
   The non-Jewish community has undergone other substantial changes since 1948. Education has become virtually universal. Local authority has grown, and through the various local authorities, the Arabs have become involved in local decision-making and provision of services. The traditional life of the Arab has been altered by new agricultural methods and increased employment in other sectors of the economy—especially industry, construction, and services. Social and economic improvements have included more urbanization, modernization of villages, better infrastructure, improved health care, and expanded educational opportunities.
   See also Arab Political Parties; The Bedouin; Druze (Druse).

Historical Dictionary of Israel. .

Look at other dictionaries:

  • No Human Rights For Arabs In Israel — can refer to three separate and distinct albums by Muslimgauze: * No Human Rights For Arabs In Israel (Muslimgauze 10 vinyl) (1994) * No Human Rights For Arabs In Israel (Muslimgauze CD) (2004) * No Human Rights For Arabs In Israel The Remix… …   Wikipedia

  • No Human Rights for Arabs in Israel (Muslimgauze 10" vinyl) — Infobox Album Name = No Human Rights For Arabs In Israel Type = studio Artist = Muslimgauze Released = 1995 December Recorded = Genre = Length = Label = Staalplaat MUSLIMLIM 002 Producer = Reviews = Last album = Izlamaphobia (1995) This album =… …   Wikipedia

  • No Human Rights for Arabs in Israel (Muslimgauze CD) — Infobox Album Name = No Human Rights For Arabs In Israel Type = studio Artist = Muslimgauze Released = 2004 January 23 Recorded = Genre = Length = Label = Staalplaat MUSLIMLIM 002 Producer = Reviews = Last album = This album = Next album = No… …   Wikipedia

  • Israel Labor Party — (Mifleget Haavoda Haisraelit)    The successor to Mapai that dominated the politics of the prestate Yishuv and the first three decades of independence. On 21 January 1968, Mapai merged with two other labor parties, Ahdut Haavoda and Rafi, to form …   Historical Dictionary of Israel

  • ISRAEL FACES THE FUTURE —    At the heart of Israel s agenda for the future is the continuing Arab Israeli conflict, with its dimensions of potential conflict and of peace, but placed within the context of numerous territorial and political disputes still to be resolved.… …   Historical Dictionary of Israel

  • Israel — /iz ree euhl, ray /, n. 1. a republic in SW Asia, on the Mediterranean: formed as a Jewish state May 1948. 5,534,672; 7984 sq. mi. (20,679 sq. km). Cap.: Jerusalem. 2. the people traditionally descended from Jacob; the Hebrew or Jewish people. 3 …   Universalium

  • Israel and the apartheid analogy — The State of Israel s treatment of the Palestinians has been likened by many to a system of apartheid, analogous to South Africa s treatment of non whites during South Africa s apartheid era. [http://www.simonsays.com/content/book.cfm?tab=25… …   Wikipedia

  • Israel — This article is about the modern country. For other uses, see Israel (disambiguation). State of Israel …   Wikipedia

  • Israel-Libanon-Konflikt 2006/Zeitleiste — Der Libanonkrieg 2006 war eine Eskalation im Nahostkonflikt. Im Folgenden werden die Ereignisse in zeitlicher Reihenfolge abgehandelt: Inhaltsverzeichnis 1 Juli 1.1 12. Juli 2006 1.2 13. Juli 2006 1.3 14. Juli 2006 1.4 …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Israel-Libanon-Krise 2006/Zeitleiste — Der Libanonkrieg 2006 war eine Eskalation im Nahostkonflikt. Im Folgenden werden die Ereignisse in zeitlicher Reihenfolge abgehandelt: Inhaltsverzeichnis 1 Juli 1.1 12. Juli 2006 1.2 13. Juli 2006 1.3 14. Juli 2006 1.4 …   Deutsch Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.